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Lady Randolph hired Mrs. Elizabeth Everest as a nanny to care for Winston. Winston fondly called Mrs. Everest "Woomany." Later Winston Churchill would say that "My nurse was my confidante. Mrs. Everest it was who looked after me and tended all my wants. It was to her that I poured out all my many troubles..."

Beloved Nanny

"Mrs. Everest it was who looked after me and tended all my wants."

Winston formed his strongest childhood emotional attachment to his nanny, Mrs. Elizabeth Everest, and to her he "poured out my many troubles." She was his constant companion in childhood and they wrote to each other regularly while he was at school.

Winston was deeply distressed when she left the household, even though he was then a young man, a budding Army officer, and the household had no further need for a nanny.

Double, Double Toil and Trouble [Macbeth, 4:1]

In 1895, within six months, first Winston's father, then Mrs. Everest, died. Winston now faced the world without his idolized father and without his primary emotional support and mother figure.
Winston's father had been in declining health and increasing dementia for several years. But, his erratic behavior and his dissatisfaction with Winston remained robust. Winston was not told the diagnosis - thought to be syphilis - and for many years believed that he too would die young. "Is it forty and finished?" he pondered.

Even in death, Winston's father remained a force to be reckoned with; "All my dreams of comradeship with him, of entering Parliament at his side and in his support, were ended. There remained for me only to pursue his aims and vindicate his memory."

When Winston learned that Mrs. Everest was gravely ill he rushed to her beside. He was the only member of his family to attend to her, and upon her death provided the tombstone for her grave. "She had been my dearest and most intimate friend during the whole twenty years I had lived." "I shall never know such a friend again."

“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.”

Winston S. Churchill